Researchers


Dr Victoria Kurushina

Dr Victoria Kurushina

Victoria obtained a PhD in Engineering from the University of Aberdeen in 2018. She studied vortex-induced vibrations of rigid and flexible structures in uniform and sheared flows using reduced order models of phenomenological wake oscillator types, with the further application for predicting vibrations of risers and free-spanning underwater pipelines. Her Master and Undergraduate Desgrees are in the Oil & Gas Engineering with the specialization in design and operation of oil and gas pipelines and storage facilities. Her interests include multiphase flow-induced vibrations, vortex-induced vibrations, computational fluid dynamics, challenges for pipelines in general and flexible risers in particular.

Alexander Elliott

Alexander Elliott

Alex is in the final stages of his PhD in ‘Nonlinear Dynamical Structures’ at the University of Glasgow, focusing on the modelling of geometrically nonlinear structures. His research spans a number of topics in this field, including the examination and refinement of analytical methods for accurately predicting nonlinear behaviour, as well as developing the understanding and performance of non-intrusive reduced-order modelling techniques. He is interested in promoting the use of these techniques to increase the efficiency of a variety of mechanical systems, as well as combining the techniques with other sources of nonlinearity, such as fluid-structure interaction.

Dr Konstantinos Bakis

Dr Konstantinos Bakis

Konstantinos received his DPhil in Engineering Science from University of Oxford in 2016. He was later awarded a one-year JSPS Postdoctoral Fellowship to conduct research at University of Kyoto on bluff body fluid-structure interaction phenomena. He received a Master degree from Princeton University and Diploma from the National Technical University of Athens. His background is in the dynamics and control of flexible structures, fluid-structure interactions and reduced order models. He has contributed to the MUFFINS Work Package 2 [pipe modelling], and now working at the University of Cambridge as a research associate.

Dr Hossein Zanganeh

Dr Hossein Zanganeh

Hossein received his PhD in Offshore Engineering from University of Strathclyde in 2015. He has developed the computationally-efficient reduced-order phenomenological models for 2D/3D vortex-induced vibrations (VIV) of rigid and flexible structures, providing a unified framework for the analysis and prediction of VIV phenomena. He also carried out some VIV tests. He was a Postdoctoral Researcher at Universities of Strathclyde and Nottingham, working on different projects funded by offshore industries and the EU. He has contributed to the MUFFINS Work Package 1 [empirical one-dimensional two-fluid models], and now working at the Robert Gordon University in Aberdeen as a lecturer.

Dr Lyes Kahouadji

Dr Lyes Kahouadji

Lyes has been developing in-house codes for numerical simulations of multiphase flows by using the front-tracking and domain decomposition methods. The solver can run on a variety of computer architectures ranging from laptops to supercomputers, including the modules for the flow interactions with the immersed solid objects, contact line dynamics, species and thermal transport with phase changes. Some relevant disciplines include the falling liquid film, droplet impact, direct numerical simulation, multiphase flow, parallel or distributed processing, interface dynamics and front tracking, atomization, and microfluidics.

Dr Claire Heaney

Dr Claire Heaney

Claire has worked at Imperial on the EPSRC ‘Smart Geo-Wells’ project focusing on the numerical prediction of optimal drilling strategies for extracting geo-thermal energy, at Cardiff University on computational homogenisation, and at Durham University on meshless methods. Her PhD at Cardiff investigated the effect of wave-packet disturbances on a 2D boundary layer, focusing on the weakly nonlinear regime. Her research interests span several areas include reduced order modelling, calculating error bounds for parameters derived from computational homogenisation, quasi-continuum method, error estimation and adaptive mesh refinement; meshless methods in geo-mechanics.